We work in a professional environment that requires us to come up with a cohesive narrative for our entire career. There is pressure to be "on track," or moving constantly onward and upward in our field. As such, we tend to see our lives as a commute rather than an expedition; we measure success based on how quickly we reach our destination. 

But life can be messier than that. Our careers often take unexpected turns that lead to places we never thought we could go, but may take us exactly where we're supposed to be. Discovering calling requires both openness and faithful attention to what's going on right in front of us. It's fine to have goals, as long as we recognize that God's plans might be different than our own. 

Want to hear more? You can find this and dozens more videos over at the High Calling YouTube Channel. 

TRANSCRIPT: A lot of times we associate the word "calling" with some kind of a spiritual epiphany, especially if you think the clergy . . . "Well, that was their calling." I think the calling of our work and our careers is much more of an unraveling over time by kind of putting on hold the idea that there's like this big magical position that you're supposed to be in and instead taking the approach or the attitude that my calling right now, today, is to make the most out of what's in front of me. We may discover something about ourselves that we never really knew by diving into just what happens to be in front of us today. That, to me, is the unraveling of a fulfilling career path that is completely integrated with God's purposes for your life.

Leadership

Leaders must reckon with a variety of practical pressures: deadlines, financial benchmarks, reputations, production requirements. Yet we are called to lead in response to God's call for our lives, not in response to manmade pressures. This may involve worrying more about broad human flourishing than next quarter's profits, or caring for individual team members more than what "big boss" thinks of us. When we lead from the soul, we lead for the sake of God's pleasure, not the pleasure of others. And when we do this, we live into the freedom that only he can give us.

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