Jul 6, 2012

Did God Invent Work as a Punishment?

A recent column in the New York Times gets many things right, and at least one thing very wrong. In “The ‘Busy’ Trap,” cartoonist and writer Tim Kreider laments our tendency to lament our constant busyness. He begins:

If you live in America in the 21st century you’ve probably had to listen to a lot of people tell you how busy they are. It’s become the default response when you ask anyone how they’re doing: “Busy!” “So busy.” “Crazy busy.” It is, pretty obviously, a boast disguised as a complaint. And the stock response is a kind of congratulation: “That’s a good problem to have,” or “Better than the opposite.”

According to Kreider, everybody claims to be busy, including children, who are “scheduled down to the half-hour with classes and extracurricular activities. They come home at the end of the day as tired as grown-ups.”

Kreider believes our busyness is not good. Nor is it inevitable. “The present hysteria is not a necessary or inevitable condition of life; it’s something we’ve chosen, if only by our acquiescence to it..”

Why are we so overbooked?

Read the rest at Patheos in Mark D. Roberts' article "Work and God... Oops! The Times Gets It Very Wrong."

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