Mar 28, 2013

Ash Wednesday Do-Over

I didn’t grow up observing Lent, and even now our family doesn’t attend a church that emphasizes the liturgical calendar. I’ve come to understand Lent mostly through watching and learning from others. In recent years, the experience has become increasingly meaningful to me. In 2011 when I gave up bread,...Read more +
Mar 25, 2013

Book Review: The Spirituality of Fasting

The list of small group classes offered by my church during the Lenten season included a study on the discipline of fasting. It was an odd choice for me. I am not one to intentionally skip a meal—or even a snack. Still, I wondered, could fasting help with my tendency...Read more +
Mar 21, 2013

Night Watches

It feels like the middle of the night, but it can’t be more than an hour or so since we went to bed. I hear my oldest stepson’s Adventures in Odyssey CD still playing. But I also hear crying or moaning; I’m not sure which. And I can’t get my...Read more +
Mar 14, 2013

The Art of Resurrection

“Is it making any difference?” I’m often asked that question related to the missions work that I’m involved with, particularly in Haiti. People love to hear the story about Richard and the microloan that changed his life. However, the reality is that Haiti is still one of the poorest nations...Read more +
Mar 7, 2013

I Gave Up Gossip for Lent

A few years ago, I gave up gossip for Lent. That may not seem like a big deal to you, but I was raised as a die-hard, ultra-conservative Southern Baptist, and trying something new in the spiritual realm was a bit scary. However, since learning about the tradition of fasting...Read more +
Click here to download your copy . What is Lent? Growing up as a Protestant Christian, I experienced Lent as little more than a joke. “What are you giving up for Lent?” my friends would ask. “Homework,” I’d say with a smirk, or “Obeying my parents.” Lent was one of those things that my Catholic friends had to worry about—another great reason to be Protestant, I figured. It never even occurred to me that Lent was something I might actually be interested in or benefit from or decide to keep or come to value as a way of getting to know God better. In the last fifteen years, I’ve learned that Lent is in fact recognized by millions of Protestant Christians, in addition to Catholic and Orthodox believers. Personally, I’ve discovered that observing Lent helps me grow in my relationship with God. It prepares me for a deeper experience of Christ’s death on Good Friday and also for a more joyful celebration of his resurrection on Easter. How to Use This Lenten Devotional This Lenten devotional has been prepared by leaders and writers associated with Foundations for Laity Renewal (including Laity Lodge, Laity Lodge Youth Camp, Laity Lodge Family Camp,...
Click here to download your copy . What is Lent? Growing up as a Protestant Christian, I experienced Lent as little more than a joke. “What are you giving up for Lent?” my friends would ask. “Homework,” I’d say with a smirk, or “Obeying my parents.” Lent was one of those things that my Catholic friends had to worry about—another great reason to be Protestant, I figured. It never even occurred to me that Lent was something I might actually be interested in or benefit from or decide to keep or come to value as a way of getting to know God better. In the last fifteen years, I’ve learned that Lent is in fact recognized by millions of Protestant Christians, in addition to Catholic and Orthodox believers. Personally, I’ve discovered that observing Lent helps me grow in my relationship with God. It prepares me for a deeper experience of Christ’s death on Good Friday and also for a more joyful celebration of his resurrection on Easter. How to Use This Lenten Devotional This Lenten devotional has been prepared by leaders and writers associated with Foundations for Laity Renewal (including Laity Lodge, Laity Lodge Youth Camp, Laity Lodge Family Camp,...
For many Christians, the season of Lent is a special time for self reflection, devotion and prayer that focuses one's thoughts on God rather than on self. The season of Lent begins on Ash Wednesday and continues for the six weeks prior to Easter Sunday. The season culminates during Holy Week, which observes Christ's last week on Earth. The week begins with Palm Sunday, marking Christ's entry into Jerusalem which was heralded by crowds waving palm branches (John 12:13). On Palm Sunday church services often begin with children entering the sanctuary waving palm branches. On Thursday of Holy Week Christians remember Jesus' Last Supper with his disciples, this day is traditionally known as Maundy Thursday. Good Friday observes the day when Jesus was crucified. Easter Sunday ends the season of Lent with the celebration of the resurrection. Each faith tradition and individual congregations have their own unique traditions which serve to observe the days during Holy Week. Traditionally, Lent has been observed within the Catholic and Orthodox traditions, as well as Protestants such as Lutherans, Anglicans, and Methodists who observe the liturgical calendar. In recent years other Christian communities have began observing Lent and/or Holy Week as a way to...
Apr 29, 2011

PhotoPlay Gallery: Finding Light

by Claire Burge
Thanks for joining us this month. Our PhotoPlay challenge was a difficult one because it required a manual setting and it had an introspective element to it due to Lent and Easter. I hope that the lens helped you to see things in perspective. We'll be back in June so...Read more +
Apr 22, 2011

Year of Plenty

In 2008 a young suburban family of four set out to consume everything according to four rules: local, used, homegrown, and homemade. Year of Plenty tells the story of that year and offers a reflection on the intersections of their Christian faith, their life as pastors, and their experiences at...Read more +

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