Especially in a hyper-connected world, it's easier than ever to focus on the lives of people we barely know, thousands of miles away. While this can be a way of enriching relationships (in fact, we are pretty invested in the fact that this is the case!) it can also be a way to lose track of the people close to us, whose lives are the most connected to ours. 

So ask yourself: Who are the most important people in your life? Do your actions and priorities reflect that? Too often the answer is no—the people we trust can get neglected in the mix of people we have to impress. But relationships matter, and are worth investing in. Maybe it's time to make a connection we've been neglecting for too long. 

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Transcript: 
Several years ago, the Peanuts creator cartoonist Charles Schulz wrote a brief quiz. It went something like this: Name three Nobel Prize winners; name the three wealthiest people in the world; name this year's Heisman Trophy finalists. Then he asked three more questions: Name three teachers who affected your life; name three friends who stood by you; name three people you like to be around.

This is Howard Butt, Jr., of Laity Lodge. What was Charles Schulz's point? Celebrities don't make the biggest impact on our lives—the people close to us do. The people you live and work with, who care about you, are the more important part of the high calling of our daily work.

Perfume and incense bring joy to the heart, and the pleasantness of one's friend springs from his earnest counsel. 
(Prov. 27:9)

 

Balance

After spending six days creating the world, God rested. Rhythms of work and rest are extremely important for human flourishing. In our consistently busy world, it's difficult, but extremely important, to learn how to rest.

It's also important to remember the importance of play. When the Ark of the Covenant was finally brought into Jerusalem, "David danced before the Lord with all his might, wearing a priestly garment" (2 Samuel 6:14). By dancing and playing, we allow ourselves to enjoy God's many gifts and blessings, as well as the fruit of our labor.

We affirm and seek to observe the God-made rhythms that nurture a truly rich life, holding in tension our work, rest, personal relationships, and play.

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